Different Types of Women’s Golf Apparel

 Playing golf is one of the best ways to be active as well as to have a great pastime. You can enjoy this sport with your friends and family. If you are new to this sport, then you must know that you cannot wear anything and everything. Playing golf needs special outfit, especially for the women. If you want to play golf for the first time, then here are the details about the cute women’s golf apparel that you will need to know.

Golf Tops

At the golf course, the women must wear blouses that can have sleeves or sleeveless top. But it must have collars. The most popular type of women top is the polo-style t-shirt. It looks great and smart. These are also available in different types of colors as well as designs. Whether you want short sleeves or long, you will get all types of tops for the golf. Wearing tops with round neck, halter neck or tank tops is completely inappropriate. You must not wear all these tops to a golf course.

Jackets or Sweaters

Often due to colder seasons, dressing in layers for cute golf apparel is quite common. You can wear a sweater or a vest over the polo t-shirt. You can use light jacket or a wind shirt for extra covering on your t-shirt too. Sweatshirts or any kind of denim jackets are unacceptable in the golf course. You must not wear these jackets. The form is more of a formal game and wearing any casual jacket is not appropriate.

Bottoms for Golfer

Women golfers can wear slacks in the spring or fall. This is the most common type of bottom that can be worn by the women on the golf course. On the warmer days, you can wear capris or shorts or crops. But make sure that the pants are at least knee length or longer that that. A combination of shorts and skirt which is known as skort is also quite popular as golf bottom. But you must not wear sun dresses, jeans or any athletic pants to the golf course.

Shoes & Socks for Golf

If you want to play golf, then you will need a pair of golf shoes. There are many shoes that are specially made for the golf courses. But you have to keep in mind that the spikes must be soft and non-metallic in nature. If you are wearing shorts or skorts, then socks are important too. You can wear a pair of white socks. But if you are wearing longer pants, then the color of the socks must match with the pants.

Conclusion

If you are planning to play golf with your family or friends, then you need to wear this set of women’s golf apparel for it. In case, you do not have them, then you need to shop for them. There are many online stores that offer you with wide range of gold apparel for women. You will definitely love to wear something unique and classy. Check them online and buy something that matches with your taste.

Contact US:

FlirTee Golf
Address:
3601 NW 175th St
Edmond, OK
Phone: (405) 568-8944

Twitter bags deep learning talent behind London startup, Fabula AI

Twitter has just announced it has picked up London-based Fabula AI. The deep learning startup has been developing technology to try to identify online disinformation by looking at patterns in how fake stuff vs genuine news spreads online — making it an obvious fit for the rumor-riled social network.

Social media giants remain under increasing political pressure to get a handle on online disinformation to ensure that manipulative messages don’t, for example, get a free pass to fiddle with democratic processes.

Facebook, Google and Twitter told to do more to fight fake news ahead of European elections

Twitter says the acquisition of Fabula will help it build out its internal machine learning capabilities — writing that the UK startup’s “world-class team of machine learning researchers” will feed an internal research group it’s building out, led by Sandeep Pandey, its head of ML/AI engineering.

This research group will focus on “a few key strategic areas such as natural language processing, reinforcement learning, ML ethics, recommendation systems, and graph deep learning” — now with Fabula co-founder and chief scientist, Michael Bronstein, as a leading light within it.

Bronstein is chair in machine learning & pattern recognition at Imperial College, London — a position he will remain while leading graph deep learning research at Twitter.

Fabula’s chief technologist, Federico Monti — another co-founder, who began the collaboration that underpin’s the patented technology with Bronstein while at the University of Lugano, Switzerland — is also joining Twitter.

“We are really excited to join the ML research team at Twitter, and work together to grow their team and capabilities. Specifically, we are looking forward to applying our graph deep learning techniques to improving the health of the conversation across the service,” said Bronstein in a statement.

“This strategic investment in graph deep learning research, technology and talent will be a key driver as we work to help people feel safe on Twitter and help them see relevant information,” Twitter added. “Specifically, by studying and understanding the Twitter graph, comprised of the millions of Tweets, Retweets and Likes shared on Twitter every day, we will be able to improve the health of the conversation, as well as products including the timeline, recommendations, the explore tab and the onboarding experience.”

Terms of the acquisition have not been disclosed.

We covered Fabula’s technology and business plan back in February when it announced its “new class” of machine learning algorithms for detecting what it colloquially badged ‘fake news’.

Its approach to the problem of online disinformation looks at how it spreads on social networks — and therefore who is spreading it — rather than focusing on the content itself, as some other approaches do.

Fabula has patented algorithms that use the emergent field of “Geometric Deep Learning” to detect online disinformation — where the datasets in question are so large and complex that traditional machine learning techniques struggle to find purchase. Which does really sound like a patent designed with big tech in mind.

Fabula likens how ‘fake news’ spreads on social media vs real news as akin to “a very simplified model of how a disease spreads on the network”.

One advantage of the approach is it looks to be language agnostic (at least barring any cultural differences which might also impact how fake news spread).

Back in February the startup told us it was aiming to build an open, decentralised “truth-risk scoring platform” — akin to a credit referencing agency, just focused on content not cash.

It’s not clear from Twitter’s blog post whether the core technologies it will be acquiring with Fabula will now stay locked up within its internal research department — or be shared more widely, to help other platforms grappling with online disinformation challenges.

The startup had intended to offer an API for platforms and publishers later this year.

But of course building a platform is a major undertaking. And, in the meanwhile, Twitter — with its pressing need to better understand the stuff its network spreads — came calling.

A source close to the matter told us that Fabula’s founders decided that selling to Twitter instead of pushing for momentum behind a vision of a decentralized, open platform because the exit offered them more opportunity to have “real and deep impact, at scale”.

Though it is also still not certain what Twitter will end up doing with the technology it’s acquiring. And it at least remains possible that Twitter could choose to make it made open across platforms.

“That’ll be for the team to figure out with Twitter down the line,” our source added.

A spokesman for Twitter did not respond directly when we asked about its plans for the patented technology but he told us: “There’s more to come on how we will integrate Fabula’s technology where it makes sense to strengthen our systems and operations in the coming months.  It will likely take us some time to be able to integrate their graph deep learning algorithms into our ML platform. We’re bringing Fabula in for the team, tech and mission, which are all aligned with our top priority: Health.”

Diving deep into Africa’s blossoming tech scene

Jumia may be the first startup you’ve heard of from Africa. But the e-commerce venture that recently listed on the NYSE is definitely not the first or last word in African tech.

The continent has an expansive digital innovation scene, the components of which are intersecting rapidly across Africa’s 54 countries and 1.2 billion people.

When measured by monetary values, Africa’s tech ecosystem is tiny by Shenzen or Silicon Valley standards.

But when you look at volumes and year over year expansion in VC, startup formation, and tech hubs, it’s one of the fastest growing tech markets in the world. In 2017, the continent also saw the largest global increase in internet users—20 percent.

If you’re a VC or founder in London, Bangalore, or San Francisco, you’ll likely interact with some part of Africa’s tech landscape for the first time—or more—in the near future.

That’s why TechCrunch put together this Extra-Crunch deep-dive on Africa’s technology sector.

Tech Hubs

A foundation for African tech is the continent’s 442 active hubs, accelerators, and incubators (as tallied by GSMA). These spaces have become focal points for startup formation, digital skills building, events, and IT activity on the continent.

Prominent tech hubs in Africa include CcHub in Nigeria, Pan-African incubator MEST, and Kenya’s iHub, with over 200 resident members. More of these organizations are receiving funds from DFIs, such as the World Bank, and aid agencies, including France’s $76 million African tech fund.

Blue-chip companies such as Google and Microsoft are also providing money and support. In 2018 Facebook opened its own Hub_NG in Lagos with partner CcHub, to foster startups using AI and machine learning.

The Slack origin story

Let’s rewind a decade. It’s 2009. Vancouver, Canada.

Stewart Butterfield, known already for his part in building Flickr, a photo-sharing service acquired by Yahoo in 2005, decided to try his hand — again — at building a game. Flickr had been a failed attempt at a game called Game Neverending followed by a big pivot. This time, Butterfield would make it work.

To make his dreams a reality, he joined forces with Flickr’s original chief software architect Cal Henderson, as well as former Flickr employees Eric Costello and Serguei Mourachov, who like himself, had served some time at Yahoo after the acquisition. Together, they would build Tiny Speck, the company behind an artful, non-combat massively multiplayer online game.

Years later, Butterfield would pull off a pivot more massive than his last. Slack, born from the ashes of his fantastical game, would lead a shift toward online productivity tools that fundamentally change the way people work.

Glitch is born

In mid-2009, former TechCrunch reporter-turned-venture-capitalist M.G. Siegler wrote one of the first stories on Butterfield’s mysterious startup plans.

“So what is Tiny Speck all about?” Siegler wrote. “That is still not entirely clear. The word on the street has been that it’s some kind of new social gaming endeavor, but all they’ll say on the site is ‘we are working on something huge and fun and we need help.’”

Siegler would go on to invest in Slack as a general partner at GV, the venture capital arm of Alphabet .

“Clearly this is a creative project,” Siegler added. “It almost sounds like they’re making an animated movie. As awesome as that would be, with people like Henderson on board, you can bet there’s impressive engineering going on to turn this all into a game of some sort (if that is in fact what this is all about).”

After months of speculation, Tiny Speck unveiled its project: Glitch, an online game set inside the brains of 11 giants. It would be free with in-game purchases available and eventually, a paid subscription for power users.

Insight Partners bags threat intel company Recorded Future for $780M

If you haven’t noticed, security companies are a pretty hot commodity these days. Just yesterday, Palo Alto Networks bought two security startups. Earlier this week, FireEye bought Verodin for $250 million, and today, private equity firm Insight Partners announced it was buying threat intelligence vendor Recorded Future for $780 million.

What Insight is buying is a company that generates information to help customers better understand the external cyber threats they are facing. It’s easy to see where a company like that could have value in today’s world. It boasts 400 customers including GlaxoSmithKline, Morgan Stanley, The Gap and Verizon (the owner of this publication).

As you might expect, Recorded Future sees the deal as a way to continue growing. “This evolution of our relationship [with Insight] will allow Recorded Future to better serve its current and future clients as we tap into the full potential of our technical roadmap and position our software to truly answer some of the most difficult and unique intelligence challenges faced by our community,” company CEO Christopher Ahlberg said in a statement.

The company was founded in 2009 and has raised almost $58 million, according to Crunchbase data. The most recent round for $25 million in 2017 was led by none other than Insight Partners . They apparently liked what they saw and wanted the entire company.

The deal essentially buys out earlier investors, which included GV (Google’s venture arm), In-Q-Tel (the CIA’s venture arm), IA Ventures, Balderton Capital, Mass Mutual Ventures and others — and gives them a healthy return in the process.

Palo Alto Networks to acquire container security startup Twistlock for $410M

Agritech startup TaniGroup raises $10M to help Indonesia’s farmers grow

In 2016, former World Bank analyst Eka Pamitra teamed up with five friends to start a business that would help farmers in their native Indonesia. Today their company — TaniGroup — closed a $10 million Series A round that’s aimed at expanding its service nationwide with the support of the government.

TaniGroup works for more than 25,000 farmers in Indonesia to help them get fairer rates for their crops, and grow their businesses. It does that in two ways: it operates a b2b platform that helps farmers sell their produce direct to retailers, which reaches a registered user base of 400 SMEs and 10,000 consumers. The company also manages a microloan fund that grants farmers access to working capital for growth.

TaniHub is the sales service and TaniFund is, as the name suggests, the microloan fund. The fund arrived in 2017 when the product had landed initial traction, and it is registered with the Financial Services Authority (OJK) and a member of Indonesian Fintech Lenders Association (AFPI).

Pamitra said a combination of factors mean TaniGroup can help farmers grow their overall income by 60 percent or more. That’s is driven more by sale volumes than price, the latter of which he said is usually 30-40 percent higher than traditional reseller channels.

“The most important thing is not necessarily pricing, farmers care more about the certainty of sales,” he explained to TechCrunch in an interview. “Many are afraid to plant too many crops because local aggregators or middlemen don’t have the capacity to absorb everything.”

“The fund focuses on preferred farmers we want to fund to help produce more or release them from the middlemen that currently fund them,” Pamitra added.

While middlemen have a reputation for operating like cartels and adding costs and complications, Pamitra said that in many cases they are actually farmers who help coordinate sales with others. For example, going to other farmers if they need additional produce to fulfill a higher-than-usual order that they can’t complete themselves.

“Some middlemen are the smartest in their group of farmers. We try to empower them through TaniFund; they often start teaching others their tips and can have a positive impact,” he said.

The company plans to spend its new money on general growth, which will include hiring more staff, improving the tech, expanding logistics and upgrading warehouses. That’s much needed since the government `has tapped the startup to help improve Indonesia’s farming community — Pamitra said TaniGroup has been given access to government research on farmers which includes a database of some 3 million farmers. (President Joko Widodo previously namechecked the startup as a company that is helping Indonesia’s agricultural industry.)

For now, TaniGroup’s ambitions are firmly focused on Indonesia but Pamitra said there is a belief that the business can expand overseas. Already it has exported orders to markets like Switzerland, Singapore, Malaysia and beyond, but there is real potential to expand the farmer network into new markets, he said. Officials from the Malaysia government have already expressed interest in making such a move, but Pamitra admitted that “there’s a lot to do here” in Indonesia first.

TaniGroup raised its Series A from Openspace Ventures — which led the round — Intudo Ventures, Golden Gate Ventures and The DFS Lab, a fintech accelerator that’s funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The startup previously raised an undisclosed seed round last April from Alpha JWC Ventures and several angel
investors.

Indonesia’s vegetable hawkers are going digital thanks to a new startup

Few things are more interesting that the convergence of old and new. It’s with that in mind that we once again look to Indonesia where East Ventures, an early-stage VC that’s behind a project to digitize the country’s street vendors, has backed a new startup that is modernizing street vendors who sell fresh produce.

In Indonesia — and other parts of Southeast Asia — street-based vendors are a common and important part of local life. Best known for street food, they also span general convenience kiosks and sellers of fruit, vegetables and snacks, who often operate through cycle-based mobile ‘stores.’

The focus for Kedai Sayur, which means ‘vegetable store’ in Bahasa, is mobile vegetable sellers. The six-month-old startup aims to bring the benefits of the digital economy to these humble “hawkers” in Indonesia.

Perhaps the most important focus of the business is that it helps hawkers get better pricing when it comes to sourcing their produce. As things stand currently, the procurement process is dogged by issues. Most notably that’s a long supply chain which adds cost — prices increase as more middlemen take their cut — and means that vegetables are less fresh by the time they reach the hawker.

The combat that, Kedai Sayur groups orders together and negotiates better-than-retail rates for its hawkers who order their produce through an app. Orders are made by 6pm each day, and delivered to hawkers by 5am the next morning, Kedai Sayur co-founder and CEO Adrian Hernanto told TechCrunch in an interview.

The startup also provides hawkers with a financial float that allows them to upsize their order without necessarily having the money up front, as is currently required. So, for example, they can double their orders for a day if they believe that one particular vegetable can sell beyond what they usually stock.

“The problem is barging power between hawkers and distributors,” Hernanto explained. “They trade in small quantity but across many products and that’s why they can only get retail price.”

With the working capital — which is not a loan — he explained that hawkers can “order as much as they can sell and then pay later after they receive payment from customers.”

“We want to remove their working capital limits,” he added.

Full repayment is required before a hawker can make their next order, said Hernanto.

This is what the average setup for a vegetable seller in Indonesia looks like (Image via Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images)

Distribution is also an area for modernization. Kedai Sayur offers an app for consumers that allows customers to order produce remotely, which the hawker can then deliver. This augments trade that hawkers traditionally do offline and, according to Hernanto, combined with working capital, some vendors have increased their takehome profit three- or four-fold.

The most visibily striking part of Kedai Sayur’s offering to hawkers is an upgraded mode of transport: three-wheeled vehicles that are brightly branded and contain a chiller section to keep produce cool. They can be leased from the company to replace the typically-dowdy bike-based kiosks that are synonymous with hawkers.

Beyond nicer aesthetics, there are practical benefits. Hernanto said the new transport can open up other avenues for making money.

That’s because the storage section is removable and it can be set up a kiosk. Hernanto said some enterprising hawkers sell coffee, bread and other daily products on the street or at night markets in addition to their vegetable sales.

Potentially there may be other options in the future based around logistics. Kedai Sayur is in talks with prospective partners about teaming up to deliver parcels and more.

“Hawkers are the neighborhood logistics experts. There is potential to utilize them for last-mile delivery as they already have a vehicle and know the neighborhoods well,” explained Hernanto — whose co-founders include Ahmad Supriyadi, whose mother was a vegetable hawker, and Rizki Novian.

A Kedai Sayur hawker [Image via Kedai Sayur]

One area where the Kedai Sayur offering is lacking right now is digital payments since most transactions are handled in cash, despite a proliferation of mobile wallets from all manner of companies, including ride-hailing unicorns Grab and Go-Jek.

Most hawkers are comfortable with cash, it is after all the tradition, but it makes paying the working capital back somewhat cumbersome. Cash requires Kedai Sayur to dispatch an agent to collect any outstanding money from the previous order before a new order can be made, but more fundamentally moving cash around is messy.

The startup currently works with Alfamart’s retail-based payments for offline over-the-counter payback and it takes a chunk of payments via bank transfer, but Hernanto said cash accounts for some 55 percent of collections.

That could change in the future since there are plans to add digital services like OVO — which is part-owned by Grab — and Go-Pay from Go-Jek. That’ll make collecting money easier, and it might also appeal to consumers who buy the products, too.

On the subject of collecting money, Kedai Sayur is — like many early-stage startups — currently in “growth mode.” Hernanto believes it will become sustainable through revenue collected on margins between selling product to hawkers and sourcing — which he sees at 20-30 percent — as well as a delivery fee charged to bring products to hawkers. In the future, he sees the potential to introduce more formalized financing in the future which could also drive revenue whilst helping provide new financing options.

“When hawkers join our system, they become bankable,” he said. “We see the potential for microloans to hawkers in the future.”

After six months of operations in Jakarta, Kedai Sayur has reached over 3,000 hawkers, according to Hernanto, with 60 percent growth on a monthly basis. He isn’t providing revenue details, but the company said in a press release that GMV — the total amount of product bought from its hawkers — has grown five-fold in the past four months. Finally, and importantly, the startup also this week announced a $1.5 million seed investment from East Ventures.

As mentioned at the top, the startup fits with East Ventures’ thesis of using tech to augment traditional business.

In the case of Waring Pintar, the startup focused on street kiosk vendors that span out of East Ventures, the project has shown enough potential to merit a $27.5 million Series A round that closed earlier this year. The VC firm will be hoping for the same from Kedai Sayur which has already started planning for its next round of funding, according to CEO Hernanto.

East Ventures previously backed a project to modernize street vendors in Indonesia by equipping them with WiFi, power points, improved inventory and more

“Door-to-door vegetable hawkers probably had existed for hundreds of years ago in Indonesia. Surprisingly, they are still available in today’s modern society, standing side-by-side with the fast-growing modern supermarket and convenience store. In fact, the vegetable hawkers are one the most convenient way to get our daily produce,” said Willson Cuaca, East Ventures co-founder and managing partner, in a statement.

“Kedai Sayur fits into two of East Ventures hypothesis. The first one, technology inclusion to upgrade the underserved merchant accessing technology and second, improvement of Indonesia supply chain. There is local wisdom that helps traditional on-demand vegetable hawker to exist for so long and we want to preserve that culture with a touch of technology,” Cuaca added.

Hernanto, meanwhile, is optimistic that the business can expand to other countries, most likely those in Southeast Asia. For now, though, he is looking at expansion into three new cities beyond Jakarta next year before gearing up to venture overseas at a later date. As the world’s fourth largest country by population and Southeast Asia’s largest economy, Indonesia remains the priority.

The savage genius of SoftBank funding competitors

Venture capitalists aren’t supposed to make their portfolio companies battle to the death. There’s a long-standing but unofficial rule that investors shouldn’t fund multiple competitors in the same space. Conflicts of interest could arise, information about one startup’s strategy could be improperly shared with the other, and the companies could become suspicious of advice provided by their investors. That leads to problems down the line for VCs, as founders may avoid them if they fear the firm might fund their rival down the line.

SoftBank shatters that norm with its juggernaut $100 billion Vision Fund plus its Innovation Fund. The investor hasn’t been shy about funding multiple sides of the same fight.

The problem is that SoftBank’s power distorts the market dynamics. Startups might take exploitative deals from the firm under the threat that they’ll be outspent whoever is willing to take the term sheet. That can hurt employees, especially ones joining later, who might have a reduced chance for a meaningful exit. SoftBank could advocate for mergers, acquisitions, or product differentiation that boost its odds of reaping a fortune at the expense of the startups’ potential.

Andreessen pours $22M into PlanetScale’s database-as-a-service

PlanetScale’s founders invented the technology called Vitess that scaled YouTube. Now they’re selling it to any enterprise that wants their data both secure and consistently accessible. And thanks to its ability to re-shard databases while they’re operating, it can solve businesses’ troubles with GDPR, which demands they store some data in the same locality as the user to whom it belongs.

The potential to be a computing backbone that both competes with and complements Amazon’s AWS has now attracted a mammoth $22 million Series A for PlanetScale. Led by Andreessen Horowitz and joined by the firm’s Cultural Leadership Fund, head of the US Digital Service Matt Cutts, plus existing investor SignalFire, the round is a tall step up from the startup’s $3 million seed it raised a year ago. Andreessen general partner Peter Levine will join the PlanetScale board, bringing his enterprise launch expertise.

PlanetScale co-founders (from left): Jitendra Vaidya and Sugu Sougoumarane

“What we’re discovering is that people we thought were at one point competitors, like AWS and hosted relational databases — we’re discovering they may be our partners instead since we’re seeing a reasonable demand for our services in front of AWS’ hosted databases,” says CEO Jitendra Vaidya. “We are growing quite well.” Competing database startups were raising big rounds, so PlanetScale connected with Andreessen in search of more firepower.

Vitess is a horizontal scaling sharding middleware engineered for MySQ that was built to run on “Borg” the predecessor to Kubernetes at Google. It lets businesses segment their database to boost memory efficiency without sacrificing reliable access speeds. PlanetScale sells Vitess in four ways: hosting on its database-as-a-service, licensing of the tech that can be run on-premises for clients or through another cloud provider, professional training for using Vitess and on-demand support for users of the open-source version of Vitess. PlanetScale now has 18 customers paying for licenses and services, and plans to release its own multi-cloud hosting to a general audience soon.

With data becoming so valuable and security concerns rising, many companies want cross-data center durability so one failure doesn’t break their app or delete information. But often the trade-off is unevenness in how long data takes to access. “If you take 100 queries, 99 might return results in 10 milliseconds, but one will take 10 seconds. That unpredictability is not something that apps can live with,” Vaidya tells me. PlanetScale’s Vitess gives enterprises the protection of redundancy but consistent speeds. It also allows businesses to continually update their replication logs so they’re only seconds behind what’s in production rather than doing periodic exports that can make it tough to track transactions and other data in real-time.

Now equipped with a ton of cash for a 20-person team, PlanetScale plans to double its staff by adding more sales, marketing and support. “We don’t have any concerns about the engineering side of things, but we need to figure out a go-to-market strategy for enterprises,” Vaidya explains. “As we’re both technical co-founders, about half of our funding is going towards hiring those functions [outside of engineering], and making that part of our organization work well and get results.”

But while a $22 million round from Andreessen Horowitz would be exciting for almost any startup, the funding for PlanetScale could assist the whole startup ecosystem. GDPR was designed to reign in tech giants. In reality, it applied compliance costs to all companies — yet the rich giants have more money to pay for those efforts. For a smaller startup, figuring out how to obey GDPR’s data localization mandate could be a huge engineering detour they can hardly afford. PlanetScale offers them not only databases but compliance-as-a-service too. It shards their data to where it has to be, and the startup can focus on their actual product.

They scaled YouTube — now they’ll shard everyone with PlanetScale

eFounders backs Yousign to build a European eSignature company

French startup Yousign is partnering with startup studio eFounders. While eFounders usually builds software-as-a-service startups from scratch, the company is trying something new with this partnership.

eFounders wants to create all the tools you need to make your work more efficient. The startup studio is behind many respectable SaaS successes, such as Front, Aircall or Spendesk. And electronic signatures are a must if you want to speed up your workflow.

Sure, there are a ton of well-established players in the space — DocuSign, SignNow, Adobe Sign, HelloSign, etc. But nobody has really cracked the European market in a similar way.

Yousign has been around for a while in France. When it comes to features, it has everything you’d expect. You can upload a document and set up automated emails and notifications so that everybody signs the document.

Signatures are legally binding and Yousign archive your documents. You can also create document templates and send contract proposals using an API.

The main challenge for Yousign is that Europe is still quite fragmented. The company will need to convince users in different countries that they need to switch to an eSignature solution. Starting today, Yousign is now available in France, Germany, the U.K. and Spain.

Yousign had only raised some money. eFounders is cleaning the cap table by buying out existing investors and replacing them.

“We can’t really communicate on the details of the investment, but what I can tell you is that we bought out existing funds for several millions of euros in order to replace them — founders still have the majority of shares,” eFounders co-founder and CEO Thibaud Elzière told me.

In a blog post, Elzière writes that eFounders has acquired around 50 percent of the company through a SPV (Single Purpose Vehicle) that it controls. The startup studio holds 25 percent directly, and investors in the eFounders eClub hold 25 percent.

Yousign now looks pretty much like any other eFounders company when they start. Of course, founders and eFounders might get diluted further down the road if Yousign ends up raising more money.